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Animals & Gardens

Explore Habitats and Encounter Our Majestic Animals.

Common Mulga

Species Name:Species Name

The common mulga (Acacia aneura) is the most abundant acacia of the hot arid interior of Australia. The name mulga comes from an aboriginal word meaning “long, narrow shield” and the…

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Family

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Conservation Status

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Range

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Habitat

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Highlights


The common mulga (Acacia aneura) is the most abundant acacia of the hot arid interior of Australia. The name mulga comes from an aboriginal word meaning “long, narrow shield” and the strong wood was used to make weapons such as spears and boomerangs. Mulga is a small tree typically less than 20 feet tall with grey-green foliage and cylindrical sulphur yellow flowers favored by bees followed by flat brown seed pods high in protein.

Ghost Gum

Species Name:aparrerinja

The ghost gum (Corymbia aparrerinja, formerly Eucalyptus papuana) is one of the most iconic trees of the central desert of Australia. Its common name refers to its chalk white trunk which…

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Family

Corymbia

Conservation status

Conservation Status

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Range

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Habitat

Highlights

Highlights


The ghost gum (Corymbia aparrerinja, formerly Eucalyptus papuana) is one of the most iconic trees of the central desert of Australia. Its common name refers to its chalk white trunk which glows in the moonlight and was seen as evidence to the presence of living spirits. These striking trees stand out in stark contrast to the red gorges and ranges of central Australia. Ghost gums were a favorite subject of the famed Australian Aboriginal landscape artist Albert Namatjira.

Queensland Bottle Tree

Species Name:Species

The Queensland bottle tree (Brachychiton rupestris) is named after its large pachycaul trunk. The much sought-after bottle shape of the trunk is achieved after at least 5-8 years of growth and…

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Family

Family

Conservation status

Conservation status

Range

Range

Habitat

Habitat

Highlights

Highlights


The Queensland bottle tree (Brachychiton rupestris) is named after its large pachycaul trunk. The much sought-after bottle shape of the trunk is achieved after at least 5-8 years of growth and has earned the tree the attention of succulent growers and bonsai enthusiasts. It is widely used in its native Queensland as an ornamental landscape tree for its ability to withstand drought and high temperatures. In the wild, it is an important emergent component of protected softwood scrub where it is often the tallest member of the canopy.